Airplane Travel Etiquette – Tips for Dealing With Stress and Avoiding Giving Stress to Others

Airplane Travel Etiquette – Tips for Dealing With Stress and Avoiding Giving Stress to Others

When you travel, observe what others do that draws negative attention to themselves; these are the elements you should endeavor to avoid and counter when you have to travel by airplane. To keep your balance and humor, be ready for long waits on lines and the foibles of others, and resolve not to check-in your civility along with your luggage.

Responsible Travel

If your attempts to make “small talk” are met with short answers, or if the person begins to read a book or work on his or her computer, you should get the hint. If the receiver of unwelcome chatter yourself, there is no need t feel obligated to talk to fellow passengers. To discourage others from talking with you, turn on your iPod, read a magazine, or chat with them a few minutes then smile and say, “I really enjoyed talking to you, but I’m on a deadline to finish this work.”

You impress no one when you share your telephone conversations with everyone on board; be aware of others and keep your voice down. Any sounds coming from an MP3 player with the volume turned on high can be heard by those seated next to you. Turn the volume off when using a computer or hand-held game. If the people next to you are trying to rest, the clicking of your keyboard could rob them of precious sleep.

Be considerate of others:

Even though you are within your legal rights, it is boorish to recline your seat. The small increase in space that you gain for yourself causes major cramping for the hapless person behind you.

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Don’t take up two arms rests, and if your fellow passenger has commandeered yours, ask politely if he or she would mind sharing it.

When you must leave your seat, do not hoist yourself up by using the back of the passenger seat in front of you as a crutch; remember to say “Excuse me” as you are climbing over people in the row.

Use the attendant call light to send for the attendant only for an emergency; save your questions and requests for when you are being served.

Remember to say “Please” when asking for something and “Thank you” when it is provided.

Travel Attire

What you project is what you get, so if you wish to be treated well, you must dress well. Travel attire has deteriorated to the extent that there is little difference between what is worn during air travel and what is worn for long-distance bus service. You may have to reach a balance between conformity and comfort. It is not only unseemly to arrive at your destination wearing your grungies, it is also bad strategy, because careless dress diminishes everyone.

You project an image of yourself at all times, including when you travel. Endeavor to act professionally and courteously while traveling, just as you would in your place of business.